These are handy Public Service Announcements from FEMA .

Tab J to Annex C, Updated :

Public Service Announcements from FEMA

Earthquake Floods Severe Storm Tornado Winter Storm

Contents

Page

Earthquake


Reducing Risk in the House

4

Emergency Kit

4

Identify Safe Areas Indoors and Outdoors

4

Utilities and Pets

5

Emergency Communications Plan

5

Discuss Earthquake Safety With Your Children

5

Earthquake: Survival Information

5

Returning Home: Check for Damage to Utilities

6

Reducing Risk in the House

6

General Preparedness Info

7

Identify Safe Areas Indoors and Outdoors

7

Utilities and Pets

8

Get Information, Emergency Communications Plan

8

Discuss Earthquake Safety With Your Children

9

Earthquake: Survival Information

9

Returning Home: Check for Damage to Utilities

10

Floods


Flood Insurance

11

Stockpile Building Materials

11

E Kit, Pets

11

Utilities, NFIP

12

Emergency Communications Plan

12

Flood Warning: General Information

12

Flash Flood Alert: Preparing for Evacuation

13

Flash Floods and Mudflows: Stay Alert. Stay Alive

13

Return Home Cautiously

13

Hidden Dangers of Flood Damage

13

Flood Insurance

14

Stockpile Building Materials. Stay Alert.

14

General Preparedness Info

15

Make an E Kit, Utilities

15

Get Information. Emergency Communications Plan

16

Flood Warning: General Info

16

Flash Flood Alert: Preparing for Evacuation

17

Flash Floods and Mudflows: Stay Alert. Stay Alive

17

Return Home Cautiously

18

Hidden Dangers of Flood Damage

18

Severe Storm


E Kit Items

19

Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

19

Severe storm Watch/Warning, E Kit

19

Utilities, Website

20

Family Communications Plan

20

General Preparedness

20

Severe storm Warning info for Houses, Mobile Homes

20

Severe storm Watch: Preparing to Evacuate

21

Returning Home: Check the Utilities

21

Family Emergency Communications Plan, Pets

21

Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

22

Severe storm Watch, E Kit, Wind Damage Warning

22

Emergency Kit Preparation, Shelters

23

General Preparedness, Pets

23

Severe storm Warning info for Houses, Mobile Homes

24

Severe storm Watch: Preparing to Evacuate

24

Returning Home: Check the Utilities

25

Tornado


Practice A Family Tornado Drill

26

Tornado Warning Signs

26

Tornado Watch, Tornado Warning

26

Emergency Kit Preparation

27

Utilities

27

Family Communications Plan

27

Tornado Warning info for Houses, Mobile Homes

27

Tornado Warning: If You Are Driving

28

Tornadoes: Stop, Look, Listen

28

Tornadoes: What to Do at Work or School

28

Returning Home: Check the Utilities

29

Tornado Warning Signs

29

Tornado Watch, Mobile Home Tips

30

Emergency Kit Preparation

30

Utilities and Pets

31

Area Residents: Family Communications Plan

31

Tornado Warning Info for Houses, Mobile Homes

32

Tornado Warning: If You Are Driving

32

Tornadoes: Stop, Look, Listen

33

Tornadoes: What to Do at Work or School

33

Returning Home: Check the Utilities

34

Winter Storm


Emergency Heat

35

Snow melt, Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

35

Winter Storm Watch, E Kit, Protect Water Pipes

35

Emergency Kit Preparation

36

Blizzard Warning, Hypothermia Warning Symptoms

36

Returning Home and Check Utilities

36

Emergency Kit Preparation

37

Blizzard Warning. Outdoor Precautions, Hypothermia Warning Symptoms

37

Emergency Heat, E Kit Items

38

Snow melt, Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

38

Winter Storm Watch, E Kit, Protect Water Pipes

39

Returning Home and Check Utilities

39

Public Announcement Scripts From FEMA

Contents LOG

Earthquake

1. Reducing Risk in the House

ANNCR: Earthquakes strike without warning. To reduce the dangers of serious injury or loss of life, fasten freestanding shelves securely to walls so they won’t suddenly topple over. Also store weed killers, pesticides, acids and flammable products on the bottom shelves of closed cabinets with latches. And secure your water heater by strapping it to the wall studs and bolting it to the floor. For more free information visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov.


2. Emergency Kit

ANNCR: Will you be prepared when the next earthquake strikes? Right now, gather items to make an emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries . A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a three day supply of food and three gallons of water for everyone in the family. Don’t forget, you’ll need a non electric can opener. For more information, visit the FEMA website is w w w dot FEMA dot gov.


3. Identify Safe Areas Indoors and Outdoors

ANNCR: You just never know where you’re going to be when the next earthquake strikes. Right now, identify safe places in and around your home and business. Look for sturdy furniture such as a heavy desk or table and plan to get under it in a hurry. Outdoors, you’ll be safer if you get away from buildings, trees, overhead wires, overpasses or elevated expressways. For more free information on earthquake preparedness and mitigation, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov.


Contents LOG

4. Utilities and Pets

ANNCR: Now is the time to prepare your home and family in order to survive the next earthquake. Teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water to help prevent damage to your home. Pets are not allowed into emergency shelters for health and space reasons. Contact your local humane society for information on safeguarding your pet. Plan ahead, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


5. Emergency Communications Plan

ANNCR: For the safety and well being of your family, develop a family emergency communication plan. Every family should have a plan for getting back together in case they’re separated from one another during a disaster. Everyone in the family should agree to call the same out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where you are. For other important safety information visit the FEMA Internet website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov, or contact your local Red Cross.


6. Discuss Earthquake Safety With Your Children

ANNCR: Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently and without warning. Children are particularly at risk if they don’t know what to do. Teach your children about protecting themselves from injury during earthquakes. Be sure to point out places of safety in every room of the house, and for fun, have them practice diving for cover. For more free information on helping kids prepare for an earthquake, visit the FEMA for Kids Website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov slash kids.

7. Earthquake: Survival Information

ANNCR: Earthquakes can strike suddenly and without warning. Whether you’re at work or at home during an earthquake, take cover under a piece of heavy furniture or against an inside wall, and hold on! Stay inside. The most dangerous thing to do during an earthquake is to leave the building, If you are outdoors, move into the open and away from buildings, streetlights and utility wires. For more information visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov.


Contents LOG

8. Returning Home: Check for Damage to Utilities

ANNCR: Earthquake dangers do not end when the ground stops shaking.

Damaged buildings can collapse suddenly and without warning. Beware of downed power lines and loosened wiring, they pose a threat of electrical shock. Natural gas leaks can lead to fires and explosions, and spilled chemicals can produce toxic fumes. When returning home after an earthquake check for damage to the utilities. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.

9. Reducing Risk in the House

ANNCR: Earthquakes strike suddenly, and without warning. Doing a little advance planning can help reduce the dangers of serious injury or loss of life.

First, fasten freestanding shelves securely to walls so they won’t suddenly topple over. Large or heavy objects will stand a better chance of surviving intact if placed on lower shelves. Also store flammable products on the bottom shelves of cabinets with latches. Right now, before the next earthquake, repair defective electrical wiring and leaky gas connections and secure your water heater by strapping it to the wall studs and bolting it to the floor.

For more free information on earthquake preparedness and mitigation, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov.

Plan ahead to survive the next earthquake, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


Contents LOG

10. General Preparedness Info

ANNCR: Will you be prepared when the next earthquake strikes? Right now, while you still have time to take precautions, gather items to make a life saving emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a portable battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries. A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a three day supply of food and three gallons of water for everyone in the family. Don’t forget a non electric can opener.

Ask your local Red Cross chapter for the location of shelters in your area, and make sure that everyone in your family knows where they are and how to get there by at least two alternate routes. For more free information on earthquake preparedness and mitigation, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov. Plan ahead to survive the next earthquake, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


11. Identify Safe Areas Indoors and Outdoors

ANNCR: You just never know where you’re going to be when the next earthquake strikes. That’s why it’s so important to take a few minutes now to identify safe places in and around your home and business. Inside, look for sturdy furniture such as a heavy desk or table and plan to get under it in a hurry. If there isn’t any heavy furniture, be prepared to stand as close as you can to an inside wall, away from glass such as mirrors, windows or pictures. And not too close to heavy bookcases or other heavy furniture which could fall over.

Outdoors, you’ll be safer if you get away from buildings, trees, overhead telephone and electrical lines, overpasses or elevated expressways. For more free information on earthquake preparedness and mitigation, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot f e m a dot gov. Listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


Contents LOG

12. Utilities and Pets

ANNCR: An earthquake in your area may change your whole life overnight.  Earthquakes may threaten your property, and even your life. Now is the time to prepare your home and family in order to survive the next earthquake.

Earthquakes can cause structural damage to your home or property that breaks electric, gas and water lines. It’s important to take a few minutes right now to teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water to help prevent additional damage to your home.

Pets are not allowed into emergency shelters for health and space reasons. Contact your local humane society for information on local emergency animal shelters. Make arrangements with care providers for pets before you and your family have to seek emergency shelter. Plan ahead to survive the next earthquake, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


13. Get Information, Emergency Communications Plan

ANNCR: It’s important for the safety and well being of your family that you act immediately to prepare for an earthquake. Food, water and first aid are essential. Plan on one gallon of water per person per day. Store at least a three day supply of nonperishable food, including medications. Have two first aid kits.

It’s always a good idea to develop a family emergency communication plan.  Families should have a plan for getting back together in case they’re separated during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call an out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where you can be found. For other important safety information visit the FEMA website at w w w dot f e m a dot gov, or contact your local Red Cross. Plan ahead to survive the next earthquake, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


Contents LOG

14. Discuss Earthquake Safety With Your Children

ANNCR: Earthquakes strike suddenly, and without warning. Children are particularly at risk if they don’t know what to do. Teach your children about protecting themselves during earthquakes. Be sure to point out places of safety in every room, and for fun, have them practice diving for cover under a heavy table or desk. Explain to your children that if they are inside when they feel a tremor, they should stay in the building and away from windows and glass doors. If they are outside, they should move quickly into an open area.

Surviving the next earthquake may be simply a matter of making the right choice. Teach your children to choose safely. For free information on helping kids prepare, visit the FEMA for Kids Website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov slash kids. Plan ahead to survive the next earthquake, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


15. Earthquake: Survival Information

ANNCR: Earthquakes can strike suddenly, and without warning.  Whether you’re at work or at home during an earthquake, take cover under a piece of heavy furniture or against an inside wall, and hold on! Stay inside. The most dangerous thing to do during an earthquake is to try to leave the building, exposing yourself to the risk of injury from falling objects.

If you are outdoors, move into the open and away from buildings, streetlights and utility wires. Remember, if it’s taller than you are it can fall on you. If you’re in a moving vehicle, stop quickly where it’s safe, and remain in the vehicle. For more free information on what to do before, during and after an earthquake, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov. Plan ahead to survive the next earthquake, and listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


Contents LOG

16. Returning Home: Check for Damage to Utilities

ANNCR: Earthquake dangers do not end when the ground stops shaking.

Damaged buildings. Downed power lines, natural gas leaks and spilled chemicals all pose hidden dangers. When returning home after an earthquake exercise extreme caution.

Do not flick on lights or anything electric until you have thoroughly checked for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear a hissing noise, open a window and leave immediately. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can or call the Gas Company from outside your home.

Also check your electrical system. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires or if you smell hot insulation turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. DO NOT step in water to do this. Call an electrician for help in that situation. Plan ahead to survive the next earthquake, and listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


Updated: June 30, 1998


Floods

Contents LOG

17. Flood Insurance

ANNCR: Floods and flash floods can strike almost anywhere. Many people don’t know that the severe damage to homes and property caused by floodwaters is NOT covered by homeowners insurance. Protect yourself and your family from catastrophic financial loss due to flood damage. Learn more about the National Flood Insurance Program from your local insurance agent or by calling 1 800 427 4661. That’s 1 800 427 4661.


18. Stockpile Building Materials

ANNCR: A flood watch is issued when there is a threat of flood conditions within a 24 36 hour period. Take precautions now that can help prevent injury to your family and damage to your property. If you live in a frequently flooded area, stockpile emergency building materials including plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber, and nails. You’ll also need a hammer and saw, pry bar, shovels and sandbags. Listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


19. E Kit, Pets

ANNCR: Be prepared when the next flood strikes. Right now, gather items to make an emergency supply kit . You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries. A first aid kit is essential, and pack a three day supply of food and water for everyone in the family. If you have pets, contact your local humane society for information on safeguarding them. Plan ahead and listen to this station for more information from FEMA.



Contents LOG

20. Utilities, NFIP

ANNCR: Nearly every area of the country is at risk from flooding and flash floods. Floodwaters can cause damage to your home or property that breaks electric, gas and water lines. It’s important to take a few minutes right now to teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water to help prevent additional damage. For information on the National Flood Insurance Program, call 1 800 427 4661.


21. Emergency Communications Plan

ANNCR: Rising floodwaters can make streets and bridges impassable. In a flood, you may be cut off from your home and family. That’s why every family should have a family emergency communication plan  a plan for getting back together if you’re separated during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call the same out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where they are, Listen to this station for other important safety information from FEMA.

22. Flood Warning: General Information

ANNCR: Wherever you are when a flood warning is issued, be prepared to move immediately to higher ground.  Listen constantly to a battery operated radio or television for official instructions and emergency flash flood alerts.

Avoid driving or walking through floodwaters, and never cross a flooded road or bridge. Knowing what to do and where to go when you hear a flood warning can save your life. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.



Contents LOG

23. Flash Flood Alert: Preparing for Evacuation

ANNCR: When you hear a flash flood alert, there is an immediate possibility of rapidly rising water in your area. To prepare for evacuation, unplug appliances and turn off electricity and the main water valve. Lock up and leave immediately. Bring pre assembled emergency supplies and warm clothing, blankets and sleeping bags to a designated shelter. Remember, pets left behind are in danger. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


24. Flash Floods and Mudflows: Stay Alert. Stay Alive.

ANNCR: Flash floods and mudflows often follow periods of heavy rain. If you’re outside when you hear a flood alert warning, stop walking or driving through low lying areas and immediately head for higher ground. Look around for the evidence of local flooding. There is often little or no warning before a flash flood strikes. Listen to a battery operated radio or TV for news and weather updates, and tune in to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.

25. Return Home Cautiously

ANNCR: If you were forced to evacuate your area due to flooding, return home with caution. Snakes, insects , and other animals may have escaped floodwaters by going inside. Serious damage to the structure of your home may not be obvious. Despite appearing sound, flood damaged homes sometimes collapse without warning. As soon as you safely can, take pictures of any damage to the house and its contents for insurance claims. This has been a public service message from FEMA.

26. Hidden Dangers of Flood Damage

ANNCR: Flood victims returning to flood damaged homes can face serious injury from unexpected and hidden dangers. Structural damage may not be obvious. A flood damaged home can suddenly collapse. Loose and dangling power lines pose the threat of severe electric shock to the unwary. A careless spark may ignite a natural gas leak leading to a fire or an explosion. This has been a public service message from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.


Contents LOG

27. Flood Insurance

ANNCR: Floods and flash floods can strike almost anywhere. Many people don’t know that the severe damage to homes and property caused by floodwaters is NOT covered by homeowners insurance. Protect yourself and your family from catastrophic financial loss due to flood damage. Learn more about the National Flood Insurance Program through your local insurance agent or by calling 1 800 427 4661.

Your area need not be declared a Federal Disaster Area to claim coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program, however, there is a thirty day waiting period before a policy becomes effective. Call the National Flood Insurance Program toll free. Dial 1 800 427 4661. 1 800 427 4661. Plan ahead to survive the next flood, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.

28. Stockpile Building Materials. Stay Alert.

ANNCR: A flood watch is issued when there is a threat of flood conditions within a 24 36 hour period. You may still have time to take precautions. If you live in a frequently flooded area, stockpile emergency building materials including plywood, plastic sheeting, lumber, nails, hammer and saw, pry bar, shovels and sandbags.

During a flood watch, listen to a battery operated radio or television for flood progress reports. If there is a flood warning, you may be advised to evacuate the area.  Be prepared to move immediately to higher ground.

Check the contents of your emergency supply kit, and fill plastic water bottles with enough fresh water to last three days. Make sure that there is plenty of fuel in your car, and memorize at least two alternate routes to higher ground. Plan ahead to survive the next flood, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


Contents LOG

29. General Preparedness Info

ANNCR: Will you be prepared when the next flood strikes? Right now, gather items to make a life saving emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a portable battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries. A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a three day supply of food and water for everyone in the family. Don’t forget a non electric can opener.

Ask your local Red Cross for the location of shelters in your area, and make sure that everyone in your family knows where they are and how to get there by at least two alternate routes. Learn flood warning signs and your community alert signals. Pets are not allowed into emergency shelters. Contact your local humane society for information how to protect your pet during an emergency. Plan ahead to survive the next flood, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


30. Make an E Kit, Utilities

ANNCR: Nearly every area of the country is at risk from flooding and flash floods. Right now, while you still have time to take precautions, gather a few household items to make a family emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a portable, battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries. A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a three day supply of food and water for everyone in the family. Don’t forget a non electric can opener.

Floodwaters can cause structural damage to your home or property that breaks electric, gas and water lines . It’s important to take a few minutes right now to teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water to help prevent additional damage to your home. Plan ahead to survive the next flood, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


Contents LOG

31. Get Information. Emergency Communications Plan

ANNCR: It’s important for the safety and well being of your family that you act immediately to obtain local flood preparedness information. Information about what to do and where to go before, during and after a flood can save your life.

Families should have a plan for getting back together in case they’re separated from one another during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call an out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where you can be found. For other important safety information visit the FEMA Internet website at w w w dot f e m a dot gov, or contact your local Red Cross. Flood insurance is available almost everywhere. Call the National Flood Insurance Program hotline at 1 800 427 4661. Plan ahead to survive the next flood, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


32. Flood Warning: General Info

ANNCR: Wherever you are when a flood warning is issued, be prepared to move immediately to higher ground.  Listen constantly to a battery operated radio or television for official instructions and emergency flash flood alerts.

If you are at home when you hear a flood warning, fill bathtubs, sinks, and jugs with clean water in case floodwaters contaminate the local drinking water supply. Move valuable household items to upper floors, or if time permits, to higher ground. If you are outdoors, move to higher ground immediately and stay there. Avoid driving or walking through floodwaters, and never cross a road or bridge that is washed out. Knowing what to do and where to go when you hear a flood warning can save your life. Plan ahead to survive the next flood, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.



Contents LOG

33. Flash Flood Alert: Preparing for Evacuation

ANNCR: When you hear a flash flood alert, there is an immediate possibility of rapidly rising water in your area. It may become necessary to warn all residents to evacuate before conditions become dangerous. If officials declare that evacuation is necessary, your cooperation is vital to your safety.

To prepare for evacuation, secure your home by unplugging appliances and turning off electricity and the main water valve. If you still have telephone service, tell someone outside of the flood area where you are going. Lock up your home and leave immediately. Bring pre assembled emergency supplies and warm protective clothing, blankets and sleeping bags to a designated emergency shelter. Avoid flooded roads and be extra alert for storm damage when crossing bridges. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


34. Flash Floods and Mudflows: Stay Alert. Stay Alive.

ANNCR: Flash floods and mudflows often follow periods of heavy rain. If you’re outside when you hear a flood alert warning, Stop, Look and Listen, because the simplest advice is still the best.

Stop walking or driving through low lying areas and immediately head for higher ground. Do not walk or drive through even shallow floodwater.

Look around for evidence of local flooding. There is often little or no warning before a flash flood strikes. Be prepared to move immediately and quickly to higher ground if you see nearby water rising rapidly.

Listen to a battery operated radio or TV for important emergency safety information, news and weather updates. Stop, look, and listen to improve your chances of escaping flood related injuries. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.



Contents LOG

35. Return Home Cautiously

ANNCR: If you were forced to evacuate your area due to flooding, return home only after authorities advise that it is safe. Enter your home with caution. Serious damage to the structure of your home may not be obvious to the untrained eye. Despite appearing to safe and sound, flood damaged homes sometimes collapse without warning. Snakes, insects, and other animals may have escaped floodwaters by going inside. Proceed with caution.

Check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and immediately leave the building. As soon as you safely can, take pictures of any damage to the house and its contents for insurance claims. And, remember floodwaters are contaminated. Take precautions when cleaning up. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


36. Hidden Dangers of Flood Damage

ANNCR: Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede.  Disaster victims returning to flood damaged homes can face serious injury from unexpected and hidden dangers. Structural damage may not be obvious to the untrained eye. A flood damaged home may suddenly collapse. Loose and dangling power lines pose the threat of severe electric shock. A spark may ignite a natural gas leak leading to a fire or an explosion.

If you are returning home after a flood look for electrical system damage  If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. Do not step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker. Call an electrician for advice or assistance. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.

Updated: June 30, 1998


Severe Storm

Contents LOG

37. E Kit Items

ANNCR: Before a severe storm strikes, plan ahead and prepare for your family’s safety. First, make a family emergency supply kit, and include a flashlight, battery operated radio, extra batteries, and a first aid kit. Take emergency food, water in plastic bottles, a non electric can opener, and a week’s worth of medications. If you are advised to evacuate the area, be sure the emergency supply kit goes with you when you leave. This has been a public service message from FEMA.


38. Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

ANNCR: Severe storms can strike with powerful winds and rain. Many people don’t know that the severe damage to homes and property caused by severe storm driven floodwaters is NOT covered by homeowners insurance. To protect yourself and your family from financial loss due to floods, ask your local insurance agent about the National Flood Insurance Program, or call 1 800 427 4661. That’s 1 800 427 4661.


39. Severe storm Watch/Warning, E Kit

ANNCR: A severe storm watch is issued when there is a threat of severe storm conditions within a ( ) hour period. During a severe storm watch, listen to a battery operated radio or television for severe storm progress reports. If there is a severe storm warning, you may be advised to evacuate the area. Check the contents of your emergency supply kit, and fill plastic water bottles with one gallon of fresh water per person per day. This has been a public service message from FEMA.


Contents LOG

40. Utilities, Website

ANNCR: Severe storms can cause hidden damage to your home or property, breaking electric lines, gas and water pipes. Take a few minutes right now to teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water, and you can help prevent severe storm related fire and water damage to your home. For more information, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov, or contact your local Red Cross.


41. Family Communications Plan

ANNCR: Severe storm force winds, rain and floodwaters can make streets and bridges impassable. In a severe storm, you may be cut off from your home and family. That’s why every family should have a family emergency communication plan   a plan for getting back together if you’re ever separated during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call the same out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where they are. Listen to this station for other important safety information from FEMA.

42. General Preparedness

ANNCR: Knowing what to do when a severe storm strikes takes planning and preparation. First, stay aware of changing weather conditions. Listen to a battery operated radio or television for severe storm progress reports. While you’re waiting for news and weather, check on the condition of your emergency supplies. Be sure you have a flashlight, extra batteries and a first aid kit. For more important safety information visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA gov.

43. Severe storm Warning info for Houses, Mobile Homes

ANNCR: A severe storm warning is issued when severe storm conditions are expected in 24 hours or less. If you are at home when you hear a severe storm warning, stay inside, away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. If you are in a mobile home, check and secure the tiedowns and evacuate to a local emergency shelter immediately. Remember, in a mobile home, lock up and leave when you hear a severe storm warning. This has been a public service message from FEMA.


Contents LOG

44. Severe storm Watch: Preparing to Evacuate

ANNCR: A severe storm watch means there is an immediate possibility of high winds and torrential rain causing extensive damage and flooding. It is sometimes necessary to warn all residents to evacuate before conditions become dangerous. To prepare for an evacuation, secure your home by unplugging appliances and turning off electricity and the main water valve. If you are advised to evacuate, lock up your home and leave immediately. This has been a public service message from FEMA.

45. Returning Home: Check the Utilities

ANNCR: If the severe storm forced you to evacuate, return home only after authorities advise that it is safe. Enter your home with caution. Snakes, insects, and other animals may have escaped floodwaters by going inside. DO NOT turn on anything electric until you have made a thorough check for gas leaks. And if you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. This has been a public service message from FEMA.

46. Family Emergency Communications Plan, Pets

ANNCR: Now is the time, before a severe storm strikes, to plan ahead and prepare for your family’s safety. Develop a family emergency communications plan for getting back together in case you’re separated during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call the same out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where you can be found.

You should know that pets are not allowed into emergency shelters. Contact your local humane society in advance for information on protecting your pets. For other important safety information, about what to do and where to go before, during and after a severe storm, visit the FEMA Internet website, at w w w dot f e m a dot gov, or contact the Red Cross. Plan ahead to survive the next severe storm, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


Contents LOG

47. Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

ANNCR: Severe storms strike with powerful winds and rain. Many people don’t know that the severe damage to homes and property caused by severe storm driven floodwaters is NOT covered by homeowners insurance. To protect yourself and your family from catastrophic financial loss due to flood damage, find out about the National Flood Insurance Program. Ask your local insurance agent or call the National Flood Insurance Program hotline at 1 800 427 4661.

Your area need not be declared a Federal Disaster Area to claim coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program, however, there is a thirty day waiting period before a policy becomes effective.  For more information on flood insurance, dial 1 800 427 4661. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


48. Severe storm Watch, E Kit, Wind Damage Warning

ANNCR: A severe storm watch is issued when there is a threat of severe storm conditions within a ( ) hour period. You may still have time to take precautions. During a severe storm watch, listen to a battery operated radio or television for severe storm progress reports. If there is a severe storm warning, you may be advised to evacuate the area.

Check the contents of your emergency supply kit, and fill plastic water bottles with one gallon of fresh water per person per day. Make sure that there is plenty of fuel in your car. If you are advised to evacuate, you may have to drive up to 50 miles to reach safety.

Severe storms bring high winds that can damage property. Bring in lawn furniture, toys and garden tools. If you can’t bring them indoors, anchor them to a permanent fixture so they don’t blow away and cause even more damage. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.



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49. Emergency Kit Preparation, Shelters

ANNCR: Will you be prepared when the next severe storm strikes? Right now, gather items to make a life saving emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a portable, battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries. A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a three day supply of food and water for everyone in the family.

Severe storms can cause hidden structural damage to your home or property, breaking electric lines, gas and water pipes, Take a few minutes right now to teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water, to help prevent severe storm related fire and water damage to your home.

For more information, visit the FEMA Internet website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov, or call your local Red Cross. Plan ahead to survive the next severe storm, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


50. General Preparedness, Pets

ANNCR: Knowing what to do when a severe storm strikes takes planning and preparation. Here are a few tips to help you see your family safely through the storm. First, stay aware of changing weather conditions. Listen to a battery operated radio or television for severe storm progress reports. While you’re waiting for news and weather, check on the condition, freshness and accessibility of your emergency supplies. Be sure you have a flashlight, extra batteries and a first aid kit. Pets are not allowed into emergency shelters. Contact your local humane society for information on protecting your pets. For more information, visit the FEMA website, at w w w dot f e m a dot gov. Plan ahead to survive the next severe storm, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


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51. Severe storm Warning info for Houses, Mobile Homes

ANNCR: A severe storm warning is issued when severe storm conditions are expected in 24 hours or less. You should expect winds of 74 miles per hour or greater, or flooding. Wherever you are when a severe storm warning is issued, avoid elevators and listen constantly to a battery operated radio or television for official instructions.

If you are at home when you hear a severe storm warning, stay inside, away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. Severe storm winds can toss debris that will shatter even well protected doors and windows.

If you are in a mobile home, check and secure the tiedowns and evacuate or go to a local emergency shelter immediately. Remember, in a mobile home, lock up and leave when you hear a severe storm warning. Plan ahead to survive the next severe storm, and listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


52. Severe storm Watch: Preparing to Evacuate

ANNCR: When an area is under a severe storm watch, there is an immediate possibility of high winds and torrential rain. It is sometimes necessary to warn all residents to evacuate before conditions become dangerous. If officials declare that evacuation is necessary, your cooperation is vital to your safety.

To prepare for evacuation, secure your home by unplugging appliances and turning off electricity and the main water valve. If you still have telephone service, tell someone outside of the storm area where you are going. Lock up your home and leave immediately. Bring pre assembled emergency supplies and warm protective clothing, blankets and sleeping bags to a designated emergency shelter. Avoid flooded roads and watch for storm damaged bridges. Plan ahead to survive the next severe storm, and listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


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53. Returning Home: Check the Utilities

ANNCR: If a severe storm forced you to evacuate, return home only after authorities advise that it is safe. Enter your home with caution. Snakes, insects, and other animals may have escaped high waters by going inside. DO NOT turn on anything electric until you have made a thorough check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and immediately leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can and call the Gas Company from a neighbor’s home.

Next, look for electrical system damage  If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. DO NOT step in water to do this. Remember that a storm damaged house may be unstable. Plan ahead to survive the next severe storm, and listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.

Updated: June 30, 1998


Tornado

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58. Practice A Family Tornado Drill

ANNCR: When a tornado is coming, you may only have seconds to make life or death decisions for yourself and for your family. Designate an area of your home as a tornado shelter, and practice your plan for gathering the entire family into the shelter. Remember, when you hear a tornado warning, drop everything, alert the family, and move immediately into the tornado shelter. For more information visit the FEMA website at w w w, dot f e m a, dot gov.


59. Tornado Warning Signs

ANNCR: Learn to protect yourself, your family and your property from tornadoes. Remember these three tornado danger signs: One  before a tornado hits, the wind may die down and the air may become very still . Two  tornadoes can be nearly invisible, marked only by swirling debris at the base of the funnel. Three   tornadoes generally occur near the trailing edge of a thunderstorm. When a thunderstorm moves through your area, be alert for tornadoes. A public service message from FEMA.


60. Tornado Watch, Tornado Warning

ANNCR: A tornado watch is issued when there is a threat of tornado conditions in your area. You may still have time to take precautions. During a tornado watch, listen to a battery operated radio or television for weather reports, and be prepared to move to shelter if you hear a tornado warning. A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Remember, if you hear a tornado warning, move immediately to shelter. A message from FEMA.


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61. Emergency Kit Preparation

ANNCR: Advance planning and quick response is the keys to surviving a tornado. Right now, gather items to make a life saving emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries. A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a three day supply of food and water for everyone in the family. Keep the emergency kit in the tornado shelter. To learn more, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov.

62. Utilities

ANNCR: Tornadoes are a real and potent threat to your property, and even your life. Now is the time to prepare your home and family.  Tornadoes can break electric lines, gas and water pipes, Take a few minutes right now to teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water, and you can help prevent tornado related fire and water damage to your home. This is a public service message from FEMA.

63. Family Communications Plan

ANNCR: It’s important for the safety and well being of your family that you develop a family emergency communications plan. Families should have a plan for getting back together in case they’re separated from one another during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call an out of town friend or relative who will coordinate getting everyone back together again. For more information visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov, or contact your local Red Cross.

64. Tornado Warning info for Houses, Mobile Homes

ANNCR: A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted in your area.  If you are at home when you hear a tornado warning, stay inside, away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. If you are in a mobile home, check and secure the tie downs and evacuate to a building with a solid foundation or to a local emergency shelter immediately. Remember, in a mobile home, lock up and seek shelter when you hear a tornado warning. This has been a message from FEMA.


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65. Tornado Warning: If You Are Driving

ANNCR: A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted or appears on weather radar. If you are driving when you hear a tornado warning or see a tornado on the ground, get out of the vehicle immediately and seek shelter in a nearby building. If there is no time to get indoors, your chances of survival are better if you get out and lie in a ditch or low area away from the vehicle. Remember, if you see a tornado on the ground, seek shelter immediately. A message from FEMA.


66. Tornadoes: Stop, Look, Listen

ANNCR: Stop, look and listen. If you’re at home when a tornado watch is issued, the simplest advice is still the best. Stop going outside, and stop sitting or standing by doors and windows. Look for the evidence of a funnel shaped cloud, and be prepared to evacuate to a tornado shelter if you see one.  Listen to a battery operated radio or TV for emergency safety information, and weather updates. Stop, look, listen and improve your chances of escaping tornado related injury. A message from FEMA.


67. Tornadoes: What to Do at Work or School

ANNCR: Most tornadoes occur when many of us are at work or at school. If you hear a tornado warning, go to the basement or to an inside hallway at the lowest level you can safely reach. Get under a piece of sturdy furniture such as a workbench or heavy table or desk and hold on to it tightly. If you are outdoors when you see a tornado or hear a tornado warning, get inside a building if at all possible. This is a public service message from FEMA.


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68. Returning Home: Check the Utilities

ANNCR: Tornado damage isn’t always obvious, and can cause buildings to collapse suddenly and without warning. Downed high tension power lines and loosened wiring poses the threat of severe electric shock. When you return home after a tornado, DO NOT turn on anything electric until you have made a thorough check for gas leaks. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. A message from FEMA.


69. Tornado Warning Signs

ANNCR: Tornadoes strike nearly every year with the most powerful winds on Earth. Remember these three tornado danger signs: One  Before a tornado hits, the wind may die down and the air may become very still . Two  Tornadoes can be nearly invisible, marked only by swirling debris at the base of the funnel. An approaching cloud of dust or debris can mark the location of a deadly tornado. Seek shelter immediately. Three  Tornadoes generally occur near the trailing edge of a thunderstorm. When a thunderstorm moves through your area, be alert for tornadoes. For more information on tornado preparedness, visit the FEMA website at w w w dot f e m a, dot gov, or contact the Red Cross. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


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70. Tornado Watch, Mobile Home Tips

ANNCR: A tornado watch is issued by the National Weather Service when there is a threat of tornado conditions. You may still have time to take precautions. During a tornado watch, listen to a battery operated radio or television for weather reports, and be prepared to move to shelter if you hear a tornado warning. A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Mobile homes are particularly vulnerable to tornado damage, even if securely tied down. When a tornado warning is issued, take shelter in the lowest level of a building with a strong foundation. If shelter is not available, lie in a ditch or low lying area a safe distance from the unit. Learn and practice tornado preparedness. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


71. Emergency Kit Preparation

ANNCR: The thunderstorm is nearly over, when suddenly, the emergency radio sounds the tornado warning alert. You may have only minutes or seconds to seek shelter. Advance planning and quick response is the keys to survival. Right now, while you still have time, gather items to make a life saving emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries . A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a three day supply of food and water for everyone in the family. Don’t forget a non electric can opener. Choose a safe area of your home for a tornado shelter, and make sure that everyone in your family knows where it is and how to get there quickly. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


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72. Utilities and Pets

ANNCR: A tornado may change your whole life overnight. The most violent windstorm on Earth is a real and potent threat to your property, and even your life. Now is the time to prepare your home and family in order to survive the next tornado. Tornadoes can break electric and gas lines, and water pipes. Take a few minutes right now to teach family members how and when to turn off gas, electricity, and water, and you can help prevent tornado related fire and water damage to your home.

If your home is damaged or destroyed by a tornado, you may have to seek emergency shelter. Pets are not allowed into emergency shelters. Contact your local humane society for information on safeguarding your pet. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


73. Area Residents: Family Communications Plan

ANNCR: If you’re within this station’s listening area, it’s important for the safety and well being of your family that you act immediately to obtain local tornado preparedness information. Information about what to do and where to go before, during and after a tornado can save your life.

It’s always a good idea to develop a family emergency communication plan. Families should have a plan for getting back together in case they’re separated from one another during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call an out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where you can be found. For more important safety information visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov, or contact your local Red Cross. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


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74. Tornado Warning Info for Houses, Mobile Homes

ANNCR: A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted in your area. Wherever you are when a tornado warning is issued, move quickly to a sheltered area and listen to a battery operated radio or television for official instructions. If you are at home when you hear a tornado warning, stay inside, away from windows, skylights, and glass doors. Tornado winds can toss debris that will shatter even well protected doors and windows. Take cover and hold on tightly.

If you are in a mobile home, check and secure the tiedowns and evacuate to a building with a solid foundation or to a local emergency shelter immediately. Remember, in a mobile home, lock up and seek shelter when you hear a tornado warning. Plan to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


75. Tornado Warning: If You Are Driving

ANNCR: A tornado warning is issued when a tornado has been sighted or appears on weather radar. During a tornado warning, listen to a battery operated radio or television for progress reports. Seek shelter immediately.

If you are driving when you hear a tornado warning or see a tornado on the ground, get out of the vehicle immediately and seek shelter in a nearby building. If there is no time to get indoors, your chances of survival are better if you get out and lie in a ditch or low lying area away from the vehicle. Cover your head and neck . Never try to follow or out drive a tornado. Tornadoes can change direction quickly and can lift up a car or truck and toss it through the air. Remember, if you see a tornado on the ground, seek shelter immediately. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more information from FEMA.


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76. Tornadoes: Stop, Look, Listen

ANNCR: Stop, look and listen. When a tornado watch is issued, the simplest advice is still the best.

Stop going outside, and stop sitting or standing by doors and windows. Tornado winds can toss debris with tremendous force and shatter even well protected doors and windows. Tornado winds can bring down trees, limbs and power lines. You are at great personal risk if you are outdoors during a tornado.

Look around for the evidence of a funnel shaped cloud, and be prepared to evacuate to a tornado shelter if you see one. Look for a flashlight, batteries and a first aid kit, a mechanical can opener and your emergency supply kit with food, water and medications.

Listen to a battery operated radio or TV for news and weather updates. Stop, look, and listen. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more information from FEMA.


77. Tornadoes: What to Do at Work or School

ANNCR: Most tornadoes occur between noon and midnight, when many of us are at work or at school. If you hear a tornado warning, it means that a tornado has been sighted or appears on weather radar, and you must act immediately. If you are at work or school, go to the basement or to an inside hallway at the lowest level you can safely reach.

Avoid places with wide span roofs such as auditoriums, cafeterias, large hallways or shopping malls. Get under a piece of sturdy furniture and hold on tightly. If you are outdoors when you see a tornado or hear a tornado warning, get inside a building if possible. If shelter is not available or there is no time to get indoors, lie in a ditch or crouch near a strong building. Plan ahead to survive the next tornado, and listen to this station for more information from FEMA.


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78. Returning Home: Check the Utilities

ANNCR: Tornado damage isn’t always obvious, so be careful when returning home. DO NOT flick a light switch or turn on anything electric until you have made a thorough check for gas leaks. If you smell gas or hear a blowing or hissing noise, open a window and immediately leave the building. Turn off the gas at the outside main valve if you can and call the Gas Company from a neighbor’s home.

Next, look for electrical system damage. If you see sparks or broken or frayed wires, or if you smell hot insulation, turn off the electricity at the main fuse box or circuit breaker. DO NOT step in water to get to the fuse box or circuit breaker. Remember to take a picture of damage to your home and furnishings for insurance purposes. Listen to this station for more information from FEMA.

Updated: June 30, 1998


Winter Storm

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79. Emergency Heat

ANNCR: Winter storms can knock down telephone and power lines, and interrupt the delivery of regular fuel sources, such as gas and heating oil. If a winter storm is forecast for this area, make sure you have sufficient heating fuel to get you through at least a week of bad weather. Have on hand safe emergency heating equipment, practice setting it up and using it. Remember, a fireplace with an ample supply of wood can be used for cooking as well as heating. A public service message from FEMA.


80. Snow melt, Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

ANNCR: Severe winter storms strike nearly every year with heavy snowfall. A sudden break in bad weather can then cause rapid snow melt, runoff, and flooding. Many people don’t know that the damage to homes and property caused by floods is NOT covered by homeowners insurance. Get the facts on flood insurance. Ask your local insurance agent about the National Flood Insurance Program, or call 1 800 427 4661. A message from FEMA.


81. Winter Storm Watch, E Kit, Protect Water Pipes

ANNCR: A winter storm watch is issued when there is a threat of severe winter storm conditions within a 24 36 hour period. Now is a good time to check the contents of your emergency supply kit, and re stock your first aid kit. A long stretch of sub zero temperatures can also freeze and burst water pipes, so locate the water cut off valves for pipes in exterior walls or to outside faucets, and make sure they operate freely. A message from FEMA.


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82. Emergency Kit Preparation

ANNCR: Freezing temperatures, heavy snowfall or freezing rain, and low visibility   expect these conditions when you hear a severe winter storm warning. Right now, while you still have time, gather items to make an emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries . A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a week’s supply of non perishable food and fresh water for everyone in the family.  A public service message from FEMA.


83. Blizzard Warning, Hypothermia Warning Symptoms

ANNCR: When a blizzard warning is issued, the combination of freezing temperatures and high winds increases the possibility of Hypothermia, a dangerous condition which occurs when body temperatures drop to less than 90 degrees. Symptoms include uncontrollable shivering, slow speech, drowsiness and exhaustion from even minor exertion. If hypothermia is suspected, begin warming the victim slowly and seek immediate medical assistance. A message from FEMA.


84. Returning Home and Check Utilities

ANNCR: The snow has stopped falling and the winter storm is over. Now is the time to inspect the utilities for damage. Check first for gas leaks and downed or broken power lines. Also check for sewage and water line damage. If you find storm related damage to your home and property, take pictures for insurance claims . Visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov to learn what you can do to safeguard your family before, during and after a severe winter storm.


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85. Emergency Kit Preparation

ANNCR: Freezing temperatures, heavy snowfall or freezing rain, and low visibility   expect these conditions when you hear a severe winter storm warning. Right now, gather items to make an emergency supply kit. You’ll need a waterproof flashlight, a battery operated radio and lots of extra batteries. A first aid kit is essential, and you’ll want a week’s supply of non perishable food and fresh water. Don’t forget a non electric can opener.

Families should have a plan in case they’re separated from one another during a disaster. Have everyone agree to call an out of town friend or relative and leave a message about where you can be found. For more information visit the FEMA website at w w w dot f e m a dot gov. Listen to this station for more emergency preparedness information from FEMA.


86. Blizzard Warning. Outdoor Precautions, Hypothermia Warning Symptoms

ANNCR: When a blizzard warning is issued, you should expect heavy blowing or falling snow and sustained winds of 35 miles per hour or greater lasting several hours. If you must go outdoors during a blizzard, dress warmly in loose fitting, layered, lightweight clothing. Outer garments should be water repellent and mittens are warmer than gloves.  Protect your lungs by covering your mouth and nose.

The combination of freezing temperatures and high winds increases the possibility of Hypothermia, a dangerous condition which occurs when the body temperature drops to less than 90 degrees.  Symptoms include uncontrollable shivering, slow speech, drowsiness and exhaustion from even minor exertion. If hypothermia is suspected, begin warming the victim slowly and seek immediate medical assistance. Listen to this station for more information from local authorities and FEMA.


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87. Emergency Heat, E Kit Items

ANNCR: This is the time of year for severe winter storms. A major winter storm can be lethal. By preparing for cold weather conditions now, you can reduce the danger.

Winter storms can knock down telephone and power lines, and interrupt the delivery of regular fuel sources, such as gas and heating oil. If a winter storm is forecast for this area, make sure you have enough heating fuel to get you through at least a week of bad weather. Have on hand safe, emergency heating equipment, and practice setting it up and using it. In an emergency, a fireplace with an ample supply of wood can be used for cooking as well as heating. Just make sure the flue is open BEFORE you light the fire. Plan ahead to survive the next winter storm, and listen to this station for more information from FEMA.


88. Snow melt, Flood Insurance, NFIP Hotline

ANNCR: Severe winter storms strike nearly every year with heavy snowfall. A sudden break in bad weather can cause rapid snow melt, runoff, and unexpected flooding. Many people don’t know that the damage to homes and property caused by floods is NOT covered by homeowners insurance. To protect yourself and your family from financial loss due to floods, ask your local insurance agent for more information about the National Flood Insurance Program, or call 1 800 427 4661.

Your area need not be declared a Federal Disaster Area to claim coverage under the National Flood Insurance Program, however, there is a thirty day waiting period before a policy becomes effective.  Get the facts on the National Flood Insurance Program. Listen to this station for more information from FEMA.


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89. Winter Storm Watch, E Kit, Protect Water Pipes

ANNCR: A winter storm watch is issued when there is a threat of severe winter weather within a 24 36 hour period. You may still have time to take precautions that can help prevent injury to your family and damage to your property.  Make sure that you have fresh water, adequate non perishable food, and heating oil, fireplace wood, or kerosene for space heaters.

Check the contents of your emergency supply kit, and re stock your first aid kit. A long stretch of sub zero temperatures can freeze and burst water pipes, causing a flood when it warms up. Locate water cut off valves for pipes in exterior walls or to outside faucets, and make sure they operate freely. For more information, visit the FEMA web site at w w w dot FEMA dot gov. Plan ahead to survive the next winter storm, and listen to this station for more information from FEMA.


90. Returning Home and Check Utilities

ANNCR: The snow has stopped falling and the winter storm is over. If you are just returning home after the storm, be alert to the possibility that prolonged exposure to sub zero temperatures may have caused water pipes near exterior walls to freeze and burst. When the burst pipe thaws, water will leak out and can cause flooding.

If your home suffered structural damage during a winter storm, be sure that you inspect the utilities for damage. Check first for gas leaks and downed or broken power lines. Also check for sewage and water line damage. If you find storm related damage to your home and property, take pictures for insurance claims.. Visit the FEMA website at w w w dot FEMA dot gov to learn more. Listen to this station for more information from FEMA.

Updated: June 30, 1998