BACKGROUND

(National Incident Management System), December, 2008, Pages 3, Preface excerpts:

“On February 28, 2003, the President issued Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 (HSPD–5), “Management of Domestic Incidents,” which directed the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and administer a National Incident Management System (NIMS).”

“HSPD–5 also required the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop the National Response Plan, which has been superseded by the National Response Framework (NRF). The NRF is a guide to how the Nation conducts all-hazards response.”

“The directive requires Federal departments and agencies to make adoption of NIMS by State, tribal, and local organizations a condition for Federal preparedness assistance (through grants, contracts, and other activities).”


OUR PRODUCTS AND NIMS COMPLIANCE (Updated: March 2010)

The table, below, describes National Incident Management System (NIMS) compliance in relation to various programs, including FEMA Grants, FEMA CPG 101 Guide for All-Hazard Emergency Operations Planning, National Response Framework (NRF), Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP), and HICS and the applicability of Clark Reynolds & Co. EOP, EOC and HICS products.

Click on a Subject, below, to view compliance information, or scroll down to the Table:


FEMA Grants

EOC and MACS

EOC and Multiagency Coordination Systems (MACS)

EOC Core Functions

EOC Facility

EOC Organization

EOC Situational Awareness

EOP Traditional Functional and ESF Formats

EOP, Selecting a Format

Exercises, Conducting Operations- Based Functional Exercises

Exercises, Documentation

Exercises, Evaluation

Exercises, Functional Exercises and EOC Validation

Exercises, MSEL (Master Scenario Events List)

Exercises, Objectives

Exercises, Realism

Exercises, Simulation

Exercises, Simulation Cell

HICS and NIMS, Command and Management

HICS and NIMS, Exercises

NIMS relationship with CPG 101

NIMS relationship with NRF

Resources, Categories

Resources, Management Information Systems

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

 FEMA Grants

FEMA Grants and Assistance Programs website. 

(see FEMA Grant descriptions)

Each state selects and administers federal grants for emergency management sustainment and enhancement efforts. Your state emergency management agency can help you determine where our products fit into the federal grant program.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOC and MACS

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 66

“The two most commonly used elements of the Multiagency Coordination System are EOCs and MAC Groups.”

EOC System™ and EOC System (ESF)™ are strategies for establishing a key element of any Multiagency Coordination System.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOC and Multiagency Coordination Systems (MACS)

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December, 2008, Page 64, Para B.

“Multiagency coordination is a process that allows all levels of government and all disciplines to work together more efficiently and effectively. Multiagency coordination occurs across the different disciplines involved in incident management, across jurisdictional lines, or across levels of government.”

“The two most commonly used elements of the Multiagency Coordination System are EOCs and MAC Groups.”

EOC System™ and EOC System (ESF)™ are strategies for establishing a Multiagency Coordination System by setting up a simple and effective EOC.


Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOC Core Functions

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 67

“The physical size, staffing, and equipping of an EOC will depend on the size of the jurisdiction, resources available and anticipated incident management workload. EOCs may be organized and staffed in a variety of ways. Regardless of its specific organizational structure, an EOC should include the following core functions: coordination; communications; resource allocation and tracking; and information collection, analysis, and dissemination.”

EOC System™ and EOC System (ESF)™ are flexible and scalable to any size jurisdiction. Both systems provide pre-formatted wall displays, a simple message form, and binders for storing coordination protocols to facilitate EOC core functions. .

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOC Facility

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 139.

“The physical location at which the coordination of information and resources to support incident management (on-scene operations) activities normally takes place. An EOC may be a temporary facility or may be located in a more central or permanently established facility, perhaps at a higher level of organization within a jurisdiction.”

EOC System™ and EOC System (ESF)™ can be set up in a permanent facility or stored in product containers for quick activation at an alternate or temporary EOC location.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOC Organization

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 66


“EOCs may be organized by major discipline (e.g., fire, law enforcement, or emergency medical services); by emergency support function (e.g., transportation, communications, public works and engineering, or resource support); by jurisdiction (e.g., city, county, or region); or, more likely, by some combination thereof.”

We offer two EOC system organization options:

 1) EOC System™ by major discipline (Traditional Functional Format) and

2) EOC System (ESF) ™ by Emergency Support Function (ESF) Format.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOC Situational Awareness

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 27


“Incident reporting and documentation procedures should be standardized to ensure that situational awareness is maintained and that emergency management/response personnel have easy access to critical information.”

The heart of the EOC System™ and EOC System (ESF) ™ is an array of wall Displays based on FEMA CPG 101 and on input from emergency managers with major disaster experience. Displays are formatted to demonstrate situational awareness and to display critical information at a glance.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOP Traditional Functional and ESF Formats

CPG 101

Traditional Functional Format, Page 5-4

Emergency Support Function (ESF) Format, Page 5-6

“The Traditional Functional structure is probably the most commonly used EOP format. This is the format found in both FEMA CPG 1-8 and SLG-101, both of which were used by many jurisdictions to draft their EOPs in the 1990s. Its format has three major sections: the Basic Plan, Functional Annexes, and Hazard-Specific Appendices.”

“The ESF format is the plan structure used in the NRF. Many State-level EOPS also use this format. It begins with a Basic Plan, includes unique Appendices that support the whole plan, addresses individual ESF Annexes, and then attaches separate Support or Incident Annexes.”

The All-Hazard EOP™ follows the Traditional Functional Format in the FEMA CPG 101.





The All-Hazard EOP (ESF)™ follows the Emergency Support Function Format in the FEMA CPG 101.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

EOP, Selecting a Format

FEMA CPG 101 Guide for All-Hazard Emergency Operations Planning (3/09), Page 5-3.

“FEMA does not mandate a particular format for EOPs. In the final analysis, an EOP’s format is “good” if the EOP’s users understand it, are comfortable with it, and can use it to extract the information they need.”

We offer two EOP format options:

 1) All-Hazard EOP™ in Traditional Functional Format.

2) All-Hazard EOP (ESF)™ in Emergency Support Function Format.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Conducting Operations- Based Functional Exercises

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise And Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 1, Chapter 2, Page 11

“Operations-based exercises represent the next level of the exercise cycle… Operations-based exercises include drills, functional exercises (FEs), and full-scale exercises (FSEs)… Operations-based exercises are characterized by actual reaction to simulated intelligence; response to emergency conditions; mobilization of apparatus, resources, and/or networks; and commitment of personnel, usually over an extended period of time.”

HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell generate messages that require staff reaction in the form of specific outputs such as faxing reports, lists, data and displaying situation information.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Documentation 

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise And Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 1, Chapter 3, Page 14 

“A Master Scenario Events List (MSEL) is a chronological timeline of expected actions and scripted events (i.e., injects) to be inserted into exercise play by controllers in order to generate or prompt player activity. It ensures necessary events happen so that all exercise objectives are met.”

HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell products generate a complete Master Scenario Events List (MSEL), an essential HSEEP document.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Evaluation 

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise And Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 1, Chapter 4, Page 24. 

“Exercises should be performance-based and require demonstration, practical application, and evaluation of proficiency in the discrete, essential tasks that enable a mission to be successfully accomplished.”

“Operations-based exercises—drills, FEs, and FSEs—are designed to validate personnel training and equipment performance in meeting critical tasks, capability outcomes, and missions. During these exercises, evaluators observe and assess actual performance in preventing or responding to a simulated disaster.”

HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell exercise messages are performance-based. Each exercise message has an objective that requires demonstration of discreet, essential tasks common to any local government EOC. Tasks include faxing reports, lists, and requested data and displaying situation information.  Practical application is achieved by requiring specific outputs on displays or on paper.

EOC SimCell presents the ultimate exercise experience for the EOC staff by providing a simple system for simulating realistic “time and distance” coordination problems and real-time consequences of EOC staff actions.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Functional Exercises and EOC Validation

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise And Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 2, Page 37

“Functional exercises (FEs) are designed to validate and evaluate capabilities, multiple functions and/or sub-functions, or interdependent groups of functions. FEs are focused on exercising plans, policies, procedures, and staff involved in management, direction, command, and control functions. Events are projected through an exercise scenario with event updates that drive activity at the management level. An FE is conducted in a realistic, real-time environment; however, movement of personnel and equipment is simulated.

Response- and recovery-focused FEs are generally focused on exercising the plans, policies, procedures, and staffs of the direction and control branches of the Incident Command System (ICS) and Unified Command (UC), or multi-agency coordination centers (e.g., Emergency Operation Centers [EOCs]).”

HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell exercise messages are designed to be called into the EOC by voice to validate personnel and communications equipment performance.

EOC SimCell presents the ultimate exercise experience for the EOC staff by providing realistic two-way exercise communications that test timely coordination, decision making and prioritization by EOC command and control functions. It is a simple system for simulating realistic “time and distance” coordination problems and real-time consequences of EOC staff actions.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, MSEL (Master Scenario Events List)

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise And Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 2, Page 20. 

“Times listed in a MSEL (Master Scenario Events List) should reflect the time an event should occur. These times should be as realistic as possible and should be based on input from SMEs (Subject Matter Experts).”

HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell products generate a complete Master Scenario Events List (MSEL), which includes a chronological inject time, objective, origin, script and expected staff actions for each message.  

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Objectives

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise And Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 2, Page 12

“Objectives help address general exercise program goals, provide a framework for scenario development, guide development of individual organizational objectives, and supply evaluation criteria. Planners should create objectives that are simple, measurable, attainable, realistic, and task-oriented (SMART).”

Each HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell exercise messages has an objective that is simple, measurable, attainable, realistic, and task-oriented (SMART). Tasks include faxing reports, lists, and requested data and displaying situation information.  Practical application is achieved by requiring specific outputs on displays or on paper.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Realism

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, c. Training and Exercises Page 20


“To improve NIMS performance, emergency management/response personnel should also participate in realistic exercises—including multidisciplinary, multijurisdictional incidents, and NGO and private-sector interaction—to improve coordination and interoperability.”

HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell realistically simulate multidisciplinary, multijurisdictional incidents, and NGO and private-sector interaction.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Simulation

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 1, App. B, Page B-29

“(2) Simulation of non-participating personnel and agencies is a technique for increasing realism in exercises.”

HICS-X Chemical Exercise™, all EOC-X exercises and EOC SimCell realistically simulate non-participating personnel and agencies.

EOC SimCell presents the ultimate exercise experience for the EOC staff by providing realistic two-way exercise communications that test timely coordination, decision making and prioritization by EOC command and control functions. It is a simple system for simulating realistic “time and distance” coordination problems and real-time consequences of EOC staff actions. 

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Exercises, Simulation Cell

HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program), February 2007, Vol. 2, Page 27

“Physically, the SimCell is a working location for a number of qualified professionals who portray nonparticipating organizations, agencies, and individuals who would likely participate actively if exercise events were real. These professionals are knowledgeable of the agencies and organizations they are portraying, and they deliver MSEL injects in a dramatic and realistic tone of voice. Depending on the type of exercise, the SimCell may require a telephone, fax machine, computer, e-mail account, or other means of communication.”

This describes our EOC SimCell™ product kit, except that its simple design greatly reduces controller training without reducing realism for the EOC staff.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

HICS and NIMS, Command and Management

NIMS ALERT: 013-06, September 12, 2006

“NIMS Implementation Activities for Hospitals and Healthcare Systems:

*Incident Command System (ICS)

*Multi-agency Coordination System (MACS)

*Public Information System (PIS)”

HICS System is based on HICS IV developed in California as a hospital ICS. The HICS System kit contains wall displays for situation awareness, HICS forms, binders containing HICS protocols and a simple message system for setting up a Hospital Command Center. All procedures and job sheets can be modified to fit evolving HICS developments.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

HICS and NIMS, Exercises

NIMS ALERT: 013-06, September 12, 2006

“Preparedness Exercises:

*Training and Exercises

*All Hazard Exercise Program

*Corrective Actions

HICS-X Chemical is a template for generating exercise messages, specifically for a HICS-organized Hospital Command Center exercise.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

NIMS relationship with CPG 101

NIMS, (National Incident Management System), December 2008, Pages 16-17 

“State, tribal, and local governments are encouraged to comply with the Integrated Planning System (IPS) by using Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101, “Producing Operations Plans for State, Territorial, Tribal, and Local Governments.” CPG 101 meets the Annex I requirement that IPS include a “guide for all-hazards planning . . . that can be used at Federal, State, local, and tribal levels to assist the planning process.” IPS is flexible enough to accommodate the many planning formats, styles, and processes used by State, tribal, and local governments.”

All-Hazard EOP™, All-Hazard EOP (ESF) ™, EOC System™, and EOC System (ESF)™ follow CPG 101 guidance. 

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

NIMS relationship with NRF

NIMS, (National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 1 

“NIMS works hand in hand with the National Response Framework (NRF). NIMS provides the template for the management of incidents, while the NRF provides the structure and mechanisms for national-level policy for incident management.”

We offer two EOP format options:

 1) All-Hazard EOP™ in Traditional Functional Format.

2) All-Hazard EOP (ESF)™ in Emergency Support Function Format.

…along with compatible EOC System™ Traditional or ESF  formats. 

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Resources, Categories

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 33, c. Categorizing Resources.

“Resources are organized by category, kind, and type, including size, capacity, capability, skill, and other characteristics.”

Resource databases in the All-Hazard EOP™,  All-Hazard EOP (ESF)™ and EOC Info Trackerproducts are arranged by resource category and by several capabilities, from general-to-specific need.

Subject

DHS Source Document

Statement or Guidance

Clark Reynolds & Co.

 Product Application

Resources, Management Information Systems

NIMS

(National Incident Management System), December 2008, Page 34, (2) Management Information Systems

“These systems are used to provide decision support information to managers by collecting, updating, and processing data, and tracking resources.”

EOC Info Tracker is a set of over 30 linked spreadsheets in Microsoft Excel® for capturing situation awareness information, listing an inventory of resources, and tracking up to 1000 requests and tasks.

All-Hazard EOP and All-Hazard EOP (ESF)™ also contain an Excel® database for describing, inventorying, requesting, and tracking resources.